Author Topic: Food and Cooking Thread  (Read 334 times)

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Food and Cooking Thread
« on: 2017-02-04 15:46:34 »
I know that we've got some "foodies", so let's talk about that sort of stuff. Given that CAINE is supposed to be a college club or something, I will try to post a whole bunch of recipes/items that will stretch out your money and are relatively simple to make. Lots of stuff courtesy of /ck/. No promises that this doesn't eventually encompass a bunch of other topics, though.

A how-to for instant ramen noodle bricks

 [ Invalid Attachment ]
« Last Edit: 2017-02-04 16:28:14 by bwbScram »

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #1 on: 2017-02-04 15:51:07 »
"Monfungo"

 [ Invalid Attachment ]

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #2 on: 2017-02-04 16:22:52 »
 [ Invalid Attachment ]

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #3 on: 2017-02-04 16:33:22 »
Tamago kake gohan is quite filling, especially if you add some protein.

1. cook rice
2. add egg with soy sauce
3. mix

Some people don't like the idea of raw eggs, but I've never had anything bad come of it.

« Last Edit: 2017-02-04 16:47:06 by bwbScram »

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #4 on: 2017-02-04 16:43:00 »
Nongshim makes a bunch of pretty good noodle products, but their Hot & Spicy Bowl is probably my favorite. Has a nice heat, and even comes with little slices of narutomaki.

 [ Invalid Attachment ]

I've never been a fan of Nissin's noodles. I'd like to get my hands on some of the overseas stuff though, like Milk Seafood.
« Last Edit: 2017-02-04 16:44:54 by bwbScram »

XT-8147

  • Guest
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #5 on: 2017-02-04 21:05:53 »
Hard-boiled eggs are deceptively easy.  You just need a pot, some eggs, and water.  No fuss with vinegar or poking a hole in the egg shell first, and no stirring or any kind of guesswork.  Best part: same directions work for both electric and gas ranges.  I'm unsure about induction since I've never used a magnetic induction cooktop, but generally speaking it should be almost identical since you really just need to boil water.
  • Put eggs in the pot.  The number you can put in the pot is dependent on the size of the eggs and the diameter of the pot, they need room to move around.  I'd say no more than four at a time, for most pots and eggs.
  • Add enough cold water to the pot to cover the eggs, plus a bit extra.
  • Put on stove, turn on to high heat.
  • When the water starts boiling, cover and turn off the heat (but leave the pot on the burner), and start a 10 minute timer.
  • After those 10 minutes, remove the eggs from the pot and place in a bowl of ice cold water for a while, this stops them from continuing to cook.
We use cold water and heat it to boiling with the eggs already in the pot so that the eggs warm up with the water, thus, the shells won't crack.  When prepared this way, they won't overcook, so you won't end up with grey crap around the yolks.

You can store them as-is until you need them, though you should probably mark the container as containing hard-boiled eggs just to avoid confusion later.  An easy way to tell the difference between a hard-boiled egg and an uncooked egg is to spin it on the counter, then use your finger to briefly stop it from spinning.  An uncooked egg will resume spinning after you lift your finger, since the yolk and white are still moving inside (yay physics), whereas a hard-boiled egg will stay stopped since it's one solid mass (also yay physics).

A logical thing to do with hard-boiled eggs is make deviled eggs, for which you'll need mustard (preferably spicy brown mustard) and paprika (or smoked paprika).  You could also simply slice them and toss them onto a salad or something, but deviled eggs are awesome so let's cover those.  Each egg will make two deviled eggs, so keep this in mind.
  • Carefully peel a hard-boiled egg.  There will be a hollow spot inside, this is an easy place to start peeling (and it's conveniently in a predictable spot every time).  Rolling the egg on a plate or cutting board while gently applying pressure can also pre-crack the shell without damaging the egg.  Gently squeezing the exposed egg can loosen up the shell as well.  It pays to go slowly and carefully with this, so take your time and do it right.
  • Make sure the egg is cleaned of little bits of shell.  I do this by placing the egg in a bowl of water and gently wiping its surface with my fingers, but you could use running water in your sink for this.
  • Slice the egg in half along the longest dimension.
  • Carefully remove the yolk from each half of the egg and put it into a bowl.  In most cases you can gently push it out from below, careful usage of a spoon can also aid you in extracting the yolk.  Don't worry if there's tiny bits of yolk stuck to the white when you're done, this is normal.
  • Repeat the above for all eggs that you intend to turn into deviled eggs.
  • Add mustard to the bowl of yolk and mix them together thoroughly.  I use a fork for this, it works well since the yolk is a lot thicker than the mustard, so you need to mash the two together moreso than stir.  I find that the ideal yolk:mustard ratio is close to 1:1.  You can definitely end up adding too much mustard, so start small and add small amounts until it Just Looks Rightâ„¢.  If you make deviled eggs regularly, you'll get a feel for it.
  • Place yolk/mustard mixture back into the egg halves, it should heap up since you added mustard.
  • Sprinkle paprika on top.
  • om nom nom.

Offline 13thMuse

  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *
  • Posts: 82
  • Internets: 7
  • Everybody loves me on the Internet!
    • 13thMuse
    • Graceling13
    • @13th_Muse
    • View Profile
    • My translation blog
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #6 on: 2017-02-06 02:34:14 »
I do the eggs and green onions thing with ramen all the time! Especially because there's only one brand with one flavor that doesn't have lactose or beef, so it can get kind of monotonous ^^; I've also been enjoying some simple meals like my host family made for me; I'll see if I can dig up some pictures. Next time we get farm-fresh eggs I will definitely try tamago kake gohan.

Hard-boiled eggs are so handy! We always have some around and sometime's that's my breakfast if I'm too busy. I learned in India that you can make them in the steamer and they're less likely to crack and easier to peel, so my mom always does it that way now. I'll have to ask her how long they go for. Also you can get one of those little plastic things that you put in with the eggs and the color changes along with how cooked the eggs should be? I don't know what it's called but it was a lifesaver for my one friend.

This is the recipe I use for curry: http://www.japanesecooking101.com/curry-and-rice-recipe/
You can actually get the boxes of curry mix on Amazon for pretty cheap, though they have different sizes so you'll have to adjust for that. Also the curry I had in Japan mostly had potatoes, maybe carrots, bamboo shoots, and lotus root, but some of that can be kind of hard to find around here so you can substitute whatever vegetables and meat you want. Curry is very forgiving so it's pretty easy to make and adjust. Bonus points if you make tonkatsu to put on top. It actually tastes better the next day or a least after a good simmer because the flavors cook together, and the texture tends to get a little iffy when cold so I recommend always serving extra hot.

Offline bwbScram

  • Officers
  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *****
  • Posts: 94
  • Internets: 3
    • bwbScram
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #7 on: 2017-02-14 00:23:19 »
 [ Invalid Attachment ]

Oh, this was post 55 for me. WHAT YOU SAY!?
« Last Edit: 2017-02-14 00:26:21 by bwbScram »

Offline ginsan

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Internets: 1
  • チーズむしパンになりたい。
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #8 on: 2017-02-15 18:28:31 »
I eat a lot of ramen and I've tried most brands, and my personal favorites are Doll Instant Noodles (Hong Kong, i like their Seafood or Beef flavors), Nongshim (Korean, also makes Neoguri brand ramen), and Nissin (the original instant ramen company, I like the Tonkotsu and Beef from the Nissin Demae Line). While I've tried Maruchan and other cheaper brands, I feel like the brands I listed are better, maybe it's the quality of the noodles, or the seasonings or oils. Usually when I cook my ramen I follow the instructions, except that I drain the water the ramen was cooked in, boil a cup of water, add the ramen back in and add the seasonings. This is because the ramen tastes better, maybe because the water it was cooked in will have a floury taste from the ramen. I omit this step for korean ramen because somehow it doesn't affect the taste that much. Their seasonings are top notch. As for toppings, I wish I could make chashu, but usually i just add seafood mix (shrimp, scallops, squid) or a fried egg or a side of gyoza (Trader Joe's are good and at only 2.99, can't beat that price).

Offline ginsan

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Internets: 1
  • チーズむしパンになりたい。
    • View Profile
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #9 on: 2017-02-15 18:36:54 »
Also I use two websites mainly to cook some of my favorite dishes, mainly tonkatsu and mapo tofu.
http://norecipes.com/
http://thewoksoflife.com/

The first is a website run by a Japanese chef
The second is by a Chinese family who like to cook.

The recipes are fairly simple. I recommend the tonkatsu recipe for beginners. http://norecipes.com/recipe/tonkatsu
Also mapo tofu is pretty easy. http://thewoksoflife.com/2014/03/ma-po-tofu-real-deal/
So good.
« Last Edit: 2017-02-15 18:43:44 by ginsan »

Offline 13thMuse

  • Rocks out at Cook Out
  • *
  • Posts: 82
  • Internets: 7
  • Everybody loves me on the Internet!
    • 13thMuse
    • Graceling13
    • @13th_Muse
    • View Profile
    • My translation blog
Re: Food and Cooking Thread
« Reply #10 on: 2017-04-06 01:31:23 »
I've recently started making batches of miso soup to save for a quick breakfast. You can make the quick & easy kind or go all #effort on it and do it the real and proper way, which is surprisingly rewarding. The finished soup only keeps 2-3 days FYI.

The full recipe is here.

The quick recipe is here. (Makes soup FULL of greens; I'd add half as much for a more traditional broth-y soup.)

About the ingredients:

  • You can use any kind of miso; it's at most supermarkets. Red (aka) is more strongly flavored than white (shiro); I use awase miso, which is both together. It keeps for a long time, basically until you see mold or if it dries out too much.
  • You can soak the wakame beforehand in warm or cold water, or just pour the soup over it; there are different schools of thought on this but it doesn't seem to make too much of a difference.
  • You can add dashi broth or not, but I think it enhances the flavor. I use little dashi sachets that I got at the fish market on West Main; just simmer for 5 mins and you have broth. The instructions on all the ones I found are in Japanese, but they should be easy to follow with a little Google Translate (or send me a pic and I can help).
  • Firm tofu seems to work the best IMO.

For an alternative recipe you can use mushrooms, potatoes, seaweed, onion, shrimp, fish, clams, and/or sliced daikon (according to wiki). They usually try to follow the seasons and mix contrasting ingredients, like floating/sinking or mild/strongly flavored. In a pinch I have made carrot and onion miso soup and it was not bad at all.

Or you can just use the instant packets; I won't judge you. :P