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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:54:47 »
Regardless of your interpretation, what follows is a rapid fire barrage of match cuts connected by a thin thread of logical association. In order…

From the puzzle piece to Sato
to Hitomi’s hat
to a shredded heart
to the heart tattoo on one of the fantasy women
to some of Hitomi’s more… alluring features
to a sunprint bikini model in a provocative pose (list to be finished next post, used up allocated number of images)



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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:51:03 »
Here we see Misaki holding up a puzzle piece, as though trying to find a place for it. The obvious interpretation for what this means comes in the next shot, where we see Sato wearing a shirt with a similar piece on it. Sato is clearly a little empty inside and Misaki is trying to fill that void. But that’s not the only way to look at it. The flat blue of the piece’s backside makes it look as if a piece of Misaki is missing and as we zoom in, that emptiness grows to consume her. That definitely reflects what happens to her over the course of the series.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:42:56 »
Cut to Misaki on the street after a rainstorm, and note how even when looking down on her, the animators have managed to use the reflection in the puddles to frame her against the heavens. In fact, whenever Misaki is looking at the camera, and thus, knows that Sato’s and our eyes are on her, she contrives to put the sky behind her. She goes out of her way to sell this image of salvation, but when the veil drops and we get a glimpse into her mind, we see that it’s just a façade. Misaki’s own expressionist framework is a closed of box of a room with nothing but stairs and a shelf to define it. The pink gradient in the background hints at innate compassion, but it’s walled in my dark, angry red, hardly surprising when you consider Misaki’s abusive life at home. It’s clear that she feels trapped and isolated and even though she has nowhere to go, she makes a run to break free right before being pulled back to some semblance of reality.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:39:50 »
The thought of that image sends Sato’s deranged mind into overdrive and as he goes out of control, his normal room is taken over by the anthropomorphized furniture that he hallucinates whenever delusions about the NHK conspiracy crop up. His mind is literally blown all over the screen and we get a glimpse of his innermost thoughts. It’s no coincidence that this core images take the form of abstract expressionism. This is how the agoraphobic Sato sees himself and the world around him. He is alone, frightened, and paralyzed within an endless expanse of identical, uniform dots. That’s how he sees other people and clearly, he does not fit in with that. The dull grey and uniform pattern evoke a sense of tedium while the murky crimson of the dots creates a tense, agitated atmosphere around the image. If there was any remaining uncertainty, this shot shows Sato to be a depressed and stunted man.
15
Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:38:35 »
As soon as Misaki is awake, she goes to leave the room, filling the screen with the striped pattern of her shirt. The title of the OP’s theme, Puzzle, appears on the fabric, and one of her fantasy girls knocks away a puzzle piece to give us a way back to the realm of fantasy. Here, we view Misaki as she wants Sato to see her; that is, a literal angel, the embodiment of his salvation, basking in sunlight before the gateway to the outside world.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:34:50 »
Misaki looks up from under the brim of her hat and locks eyes with us giving us a peek inside her mind. Female silhouettes in stylish garb reminiscent of the old Ipod "Silhouette" ads and Sega’s surreal VS minigame collection “Feel the Magic” are seen milling about against a sunny yellow background. The lack of distinct facial features (aside from some slightly sexualized mouths) demonstrates that these aren’t supposed to be proper characters, but rather, symbolic elements. The women are fashionable, sexy, happy, sociable, and very, very tan. They represent aspects of femininity that miserable, quiet, and tiny Misaki wishes she could embody. The dream is broken by her ringing alarm and we’re brought into the real world to see a glimpse of her room. From an animation standpoint, the camera movement in this shot is stunning; I actually made a gif from this clip just to highlight how cool it is.
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What we see in Misaki’s room definitely speaks to her character. Shelves full of neatly arranged books with a few stuffed animals tucked neatly underneath, makeup, beauty products, and perfume arrange into neat little baskets; this is the room of someone who is very organized, very concerned with being presentable, and very, very repressed.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:24:43 »
Inside Sato’s room, the only light comes from his computer monitor and a thin crack in the curtains. Beside him, stacked nearly to the ceiling are miscellaneous boxes; remnants of past meals, products ordered online, and likely things he moved in with and never put away, all dropped haphazardly within arm’s reach. Speaking of reaching arms, it becomes clear what Sato is using his for as well as what he in looking at when he hurriedly moves to grab a single tissue from the box atop the stack. This knocks the top box off the precarious tower in one of the more imaginative metaphors for ejaculation that I’ve ever seen. The falling box also highlights one of my favorite aspects of this OP, namely that the credits all exist as physical objects in the world, much like they do in OPs for Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure. From the show’s title etched in glass to the sun playing off the characters of the credits from the balcony shot, to the titles behind Misaki appearing backwards before we see them from the proper angle, great care has been taken to make each one an essential part of the OP’s world. It’s details like this that are the mark of a really good strong opening sequence.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:20:29 »
We zoom into the back page of Sato’s menu, which oddly happens to be the outside of his apartment. They say that there’s a lot you can learn about a man by looking at his home, and that’s certainly true of Sato. Looking up at the patios of his apartment complex, we see that Sato, who rarely bothers to get out or take care of himself, is the only one of his neighbors who hasn’t left laundry hanging to air out. Despite it being on the top floor, we descend into Sato’s room as if it were some sort of dungeon, sliding through the gap under the guardrail as the bright sun gives way to the darkness within.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:17:37 »
The way that we’re introduced to Sato says a lot about him right off the bat. His head is hung low in despair and we are separated from the emotional truths of the painting and Misaki in addition to the sole spot of light that they happen to occupy by a number of barriers. We can also glean a lot of information about Misaki too. She’s shown examining the painting, which if we take it to be symbolic of Sato’s mental state, is pretty similar to the role that she attempt to take in his life. By only showing us a wry smile and her back, the OP presents her as somewhat of an enigma, which is how she first appeared to Sato in the series. But how she enters the frame is even more telling. She more or less forces herself into the center of the shot, dominating the entire picture. This hints at her borderline pathological need for Sato (or anyone’s) attention. We also see a bit of Yamazaki and though he’s mostly a neutral presence on screen, it’s his initial motion in opening the door (oh, that’s very powerful wrt thematics) that cues Sato to raise his head and let the OP move forward.
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Animation / Re: Segments of Animation That You Find Interesting
« Last post by bwbScram on 2017-06-27 23:13:14 »
The very first image in this OP is an abstract expressionist painting reminiscent of Hans Hoffman. Right off the bat, we've got something to unpack here. In order to understand the implications of this shot, we need to understand the intention of the art style from which it draws. The abstract expressionist movement emerged as a response to the undercurrent of anxiety in the wake of World War 2, and aimed to capture universal, dare I say primitive themes through the use of simple, evocative imagery. Abstract expressionist paintings are pieces of profound emotional depth and at its core, and the same can be said of Welcome to the NHK. However this sentiment is hidden in the same way that the painting is obscured when Misaki steps in front of it and we pull away through the smoked glass to Sato.
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